Are you in the Word enough so that it is converting your soul?

The law of the Lord is perfect, converting the soul; the testimony of the Lord is sure, making wise the simple… Psalm 19:7 NKJV.

That the “law of the Lord is perfect” is direct reference to the absolute, complete, and entire trustworthiness of the Holy Scriptures, which constitute the Bible. psalm nineteenseven

The Word of God is perfect in its accuracy and sure in its dependability. There are two terms generally used to describe these features of God’s Word:

  1. Inerrant (perfect) means that, in the original copies of each manuscript written by each Bible book’s respective author, there was nothing mistaken or tinged with error. (Further, the excellence of the Holy Spirit’s protection of the Scriptures over centuries has insured that the copies delivered into our hands from generations past are essentially the same. Even literary critics who claim no faith in the truth of the Bible attest to its being the most completely reliable of any book transmitted from antiquity, in terms of its actually remaining unchanged and dependably accurate.)
  2. Infallible refers to the fact that the Bible is unfailing as an absolutely trustworthy guide for our faith (belief in God) and practice (Life and behavior). This is so because God is true (John 3:33; 17:3), because His Word reveals His truth (17:17), and because God cannot lie (Num.23:19; Titus 1:2; Heb.6:18).

 

Advertisements

Why are there so many versions of the Bible in English?

 

The Bible has been translated into many languages from the biblical languages of Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek. As of November 2014 the full Bible has been translated into 531 languages, and 2,883 languages have at least some portion of the Bibleso many Bibles

For many people this huge variety is totally confusing and they just don’t know which Bible to choose. How did we get into this situation anyway?

At the heart of the problem are two views as to what a translation should be. On one side are those who feel a translation should stick just as closely as possible to every word of the original Hebrew and Greek. They want the translation to be a literal transfer, word for word, of the original words into English. They feel this will provide the greatest accuracy possible and, after all, this is the aim, isn’t it?

Unfortunately, that approach encounters real problems. Some words simply don’t have an exact equivalent in English. The word order and the entire sentence structure just don’t match from one language to another. So these word-for-word translations are wooden and unnatural. They may be used for close study, but they often fail in terms of comprehension and readability. On the other side are those who feel a translation should transfer the message, that is, the exact thought and emotion of the original text. To do this, it should use as many words as are necessary to reproduce the idea precisely in English. You don’t really obtain accuracy, they contend, by a word-for-word translation, but you do when you convey the concept, the message, of the original, so that the reader understands it. In the end, they say, a thought-for-thought translation is actually more accurate as well as more understandable. They invite us to compare Job 36:33 in a literal translation (the venerable King James Version) and a thought-for-thought translation (the New International Version):

King James Version New International Version
The noise thereof showeth concerning it, the cattle also concerning the vapor. His thunder announces the coming storm; even the cattle make known its approach.

Of course, since the KJV dates from 1611, it contains some archaic language, but the message of the KJV in this verse is also very difficult to decipher. In the NIV in this case the thought comes through with more clarity.

Translations also differ as to the reading level of the reader. They vary from a third grade to a twelfth grade reading level. The lower reading level translations have shorter sentences, draw from a smaller English word pool, and avoid all uncommon words. Some employ a vocabulary limited to 1000 words.

Let’s review several of the best-known translations. We cited two translations in the passage just quoted, and they are the two most widely used of all English translations:

  • The King James Version is loved for the majesty of its language and for the way God has used it in ministering to millions down through the centuries. Some Christians feel that no other translation can possibly replace it.
  • The New International Version is today the most widely distributed and utilized translation in the world. It is a thought-for-thought translation, but employs a moderately traditional tone that makes it appropriate for both public worship and personal reading.
  • A recent translation that is gaining widespread acceptance and uses contemporary terminology is the New Living Translation.
  • Another widely used translation is the New American Standard Bible, which is a more literal rendition.
  • The New Revised Standard Version, is a contemporary thought-for-thought translation.

So which is the best translation?

As you can see, there are many audiences and many different kinds of readers. You should decide what kind of reader you are and estimate your reading level. Are you seeking a literal translation or one that provides a thought-for-thought presentation? Do you prefer the historic dignity of theKing James Version, the New International Version, or the very readable and contemporary New Living Translation? Consult a knowledgeable Christian and then immerse yourself in God’s Word!

Each translation has the power to transform your life. Though the cadence and the terminology may differ, the voice of God can speak to you through each one. Then the question remains: how will you respond to God’s voice as He speaks to you from the pages of this life-changing book?

For a list of translations:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_Bible_translations.

Food for thought: Could the American Bible Publishing company’s have a vested interest in stirring the confusion of “which Bible should I choose?” How about a little American Capitalism at work :”You can have any color car you want, as long as it is black.” Henry Ford.

Far too many fools in their folly

I am amazed at the super intellectual progressive branch of so called Christianity. One just has to read some of their posts on the internet to come away with a strong check in ones personal spirit. Amazing rebukes to the literal reading of Scriptures like, “The sin of Sodom (Gen.19:4, 5) was not a request for homosexual acts, but inhospitality.” Here in lies the pervasive manifestation of what the Bible calls and labels fools and their folly.

Let a man meet a bear robbed of her cubs, rather than a fool in his folly. Proverbs 17:12 NKJV.homosexuality-is-in

Fool, nabal, Strong’s # 5036: Nabal (noun) is used widely used in Proverbs, the term nabal frequently translated “fool” and nebala, “folly”; nabal, however, denotes a wicked person, an evil character, “shamelessly immoral,” equivalent to “a son of Belial” Nebala carries the same meaning as nabal, a disregard for moral and spiritual claims.

In every way, a nebala is senseless, impious and a disgrace, and his actions are sinful folly. Nebala refers to sins of immorality. A request for homosexual relations was regarded as an act of folly (Genesis 19:4, 5; Judges 19:23, 24).

Folly and fool are opposite to wisdom and wise. Being a fool is a way of life enticing to the immature, but can lead to destruction and ruin. In comparing wisdom and folly, wisdom excels folly as light excels darkness (Eccl. 2:1-13). Involved in this conclusion is that wisdom leads a person on the right path to the brightness of the full day while folly entices one to the way that leads into darkness (Pro. 4:18, 19).

Apparently he does not concentrate on what is right (Prov. 17:24). Associating with a fool, who has a twisted sense of values deprives one of knowledge (Prov. 14:7).

A fool is not someone of diminished intellectual capacity, nor a court jester, but one who makes an intellectual decision to choose moral perversion as a life style.

Now what if you don’t want to be the “companion of fools” but you want to try to reason with one? The reality is you can’t reason with a fool, because it’s inevitably going to become an argument.

The Bible is very clear about the hostility you should expect from a fool: Proverbs 12:16 A fool’s wrath is known at once. Fools are quick tempered and will often respond with anger. It’s so miserable dealing with a fool Proverbs 17:12 says it’s better to “Meet a bear robbed of her cubs,than a fool in his folly.” A fool will hate what you have to say: Proverbs 23:9 Do not speak in the hearing of a fool, for he will despise the wisdom of your words. And Proverbs 14:9 says “fools mock at sin” describing the scorn you’ll receive if you correct or rebuke a fool.

 The clear instruction from Scripture is not to waste your time dealing with a fool; it is a futile, frustrating endeavor. You can’t talk any sense into a fool, and not to sound too simple, but this is what makes him a fool: he won’t listen. He won’t learn.

He could experience terrible punishment and discipline, but he won’t change: Proverbs 27:22 Though you grind a fool in a mortar with a pestle along with crushed grain, yet his foolishness will not depart from him. If he would listen he wouldn’t be a fool: Proverbs 8:5 O you simple ones, understand prudence, And you fools, be of an understanding heart. The unfortunate reality though is the best solution with a fool is to let him continue in his foolishness.

The problem though is it’s hard not to respond to a fool: Proverbs 27:3 A stone is heavy and sand is weighty, but the provocation of a fool is heavier than both. When a fool provokes you it’s hard (heavy) not to respond, all the while knowing if you don’t respond the person will remain a fool. This creates a dilemma in that you know you can’t respond, but you feel like you should. The situation is described perfectly in Proverbs 26:4 and 5:

  • Proverbs 26:4 Do not answer a fool according to his folly, lest you also be like him. You’ll “be like him” in two ways:
  1. It is so foolish to answer a fool you have to be one to do so.
  2. You won’t be able to help but look like a fool when you respond, hence the quote, “Don’t argue with a fool because onlookers won’t be able to tell the difference.”
  • Proverbs 26:5 Answer a fool according to his folly, lest he be wise in his own eyes. You want to respond so he doesn’t continue to think he’s right and remain a fool.

You have a verse saying not to answer a fool and a verse saying to answer a fool. It looks like a contradiction unless you consider how well it captures the predicament you’re in with a fool: you can’t answer a fool because of his foolishness, but you feel like you should answer so he doesn’t continue in his foolishness. Despite how much you might want to respond though – Don’t! – unless you want the frustration the Bible clearly warns you’ll experience.

 

Is God Singular or Plural?

Genesis 1:26,27

“And God said, let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth. So God created man in His own image, in the image of God created He him; male and female created He them.”the trinityfivebyfive

Is God singular (Deut. 6:4; 32:39; Isa.45:5; John 17:3; 1 Cor. 8:6) or plural (Gen. 3:22; 18:1-3; Ps.97:7; Isa.48:16; John 10:34-38)? The Hebrew word for God is `elohim Strong’s #430, a plural noun.

In Genesis 1:1 it is used in grammatical agreement with a singular verb, bara strong’s#1254, “created.” When the plural pronouns in “Let us make man in our image after our likeness: are used, does it mean an august plural of excellence or majesty? Is God speaking to the angels or to the earth or nature? Or is this a germinal hint of (first mention) a distinction in the divine personality?

No one can be certain. Until Jesus came, the internal unity of the Godhead was not understood. God is essentially Spirit (John 4:24). Therefore, man, who is similar to God, possesses an immortal spirit. We resemble God in certain respects without being equal with Him (Isa. 40:25).

God the Father has a soul (Matt.12:18), God has a body (John 1:14) in Jesus, and God is Spirit in the Holy Spirit (John 1:33). Man’s likeness to God is what truly distinguishes mankind from the rest of creation. Man is a person with the power to think, feel, and decide.

He has the capacity for moral choices and spiritual growth or decline. In the beginning, man loved God and hated unrighteousness. The fall reversed this. Man was still a person with the capacity for good, but his spirit was altered by sin so much that he now generally runs away from God and loves evil more than righteousness (John 3:19,20).

Man is no longer in the perfect state of innocence as at the time of creation. Therefore, he does not have the same spiritual, God like attributes and qualities of that original state. Jesus, the last Adam (Rom.5:18, 19), came to undue Satan’s works (1 John 3:8), to restore a spiritual likeness to God.

The doctrine of the Trinity means that there is one God who eternally exists as three distinct Persons — the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Stated differently, God is one in essence and three in person. These definitions express three crucial truths: (1) The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are distinct Persons, (2) each Person is fully God, (3) there is only one God.

 

 

 

 

Speak the truth in love, stop being passive.

Westminster Theological Seminary President: Christians Need to Stand Up in Public Square, Politics to ‘Reclaim Judeo-Christian Heritage’

BY SAMUEL SMITH , CP REPORTER

February 28, 2015|8:38 am

Speaking at Westminster Theological Seminary’s second-ever “Real State of the Union” conference last Saturday, three Christian scholars stressed to attendees that it is time for Christians to faithfully stand up in the public square and reclaim America’s Judeo-Christian heritage from what has become a prominently secular society.

“I am calling on all believers to have a recommitment to the truth of Christ to speak the truth and love, to be who we are and to engage in justice by being committed to justice and seeing to it by speaking in the public square,” Westminster Theological Seminary President Peter Lillback said. “We are not forcing ourselves into a place that we don’t belong. This public square was created by this Judeo-Christian heritage that we are speaking about.”

I’ve had a complaint for a while that far too many Christians have become intimidated into
being passive.   That’s not what we’re supposed to be and it isn’t what’s required of us.   Islam poses a great threat and passivity won’t cut it.   love and passivity

Christian Post …Lillback set the tone for the day-long conference, which was held at First Presbyterian Church in Bonita Springs, Florida, with an event-opening speech providing a rundown of how America has transformed from a country that was discovered and founded on Christian values to a society that now largely mocks and ridicules Christians who act in accordance to their religious beliefs.

“We are now in a day that was much like what first century Christians faced in a pluralistic world that was antagonistic to their Christian values,” Lillback told The Christian Post. “We aren’t even beginning to pay the price that our forefathers did for their faith.”

“Yes, we will be persecuted. Yes, we will be criticized. Yes, we will be assaulted. But Jesus said, ‘Be glad and rejoice for that is what they did to the prophets before you,'” Lillback continued.

Providing an example of how the government is now treats Christians and their faith, Lillback highlighted the military chaplain who was “condemned” in December for talking about his faith during a suicide prevention class.

Lillback explained that although many secularists today claim that religion has no role in government or the public sector, America’s Founding Fathers actually intended for the country to be one where politicians and public officials are free to make decisions based on their faith.

Lillback points out that the Founding Fathers specifically included four references to God in the Declaration of Independence and opines that they are indications that more trust needs to be put into God when it comes to leading and governing a nation that is supposed to be free of tyranny.

“So its been observed that the four references to God actually reflect the very form of government that the Constitution will eventually create,” Lillback said. “There are lawgivers. God is a giver of law. There are judges. God is the supreme judge. There are executives. God is the executor of his will through providence.”

Lillback added that God is also present in the Constitution, although others might disagree. Things such as the president having the option to take Sundays for sabbath and the president having to swear on the Bible when he takes his oath of office are clear reminders of how the Founding Fathers intended for the light of God to help drive the success of the nation, and protect it from human imperfection.

“Some people have said that the Constitution is a godless constitution, but it’s actually remarkably Christian in many ways,” Lillback asserted. “The most Christian element of all the Constitution is the lack of trust in human nature. All the ways in which there are checks and balances and there are different branches of government and the severance of power. Those are a recognition that man has basically corrupted and he will be even more corrupted when he has power.”

Lillback further explained that Christianity was a crucial part of public education and helped fuel the country’s Judeo-Christian morals up until the 1890s, as half of the boards of public universities were comprised of clergymen.

“When you get to the 1890s with the Holy Trinity case, you get to the highwater mark for Judeo-Christian value structure. But at this point, this is where we begin to see the movement from the very highest levels beginning to de-christianize the Universities,” Lillback said. “They began to push theological and seminary studies out of the universities and replaced it with the study of religions. Over time, it becomes more and more committed, not to deism but ultimately a form of practical atheism to where atheism became the prevailing view of our universities. That begins to take hold in the progressive era in the early 1900s.”

Harry Reeder, senior pastor at Briarwood Presbyterian Church in Birmingham, Alabama, followed Lillback’s historical rundown with his speech on the “downward spiral of the culture.”

Secular viewpoints became dominant in America in the later half of the 20th century and now 21st century pluralistic and post-modern culture has created hostility towards the same morals and values that America was founded on.things that matter

Following Reeder’s lecture, Bruce Waltke, a reformed evangelical professor of Old Testament and Hebrew, told the audience that Christians and the church need to be far more active in politics than they currently are.

“[Waltke’s] Impact has been enormous. In studying the Proverbs, he has come to the conclusion that the church ought to be far more involved in the public square and the political activity if we take the teaching of the Proverbs seriously,” Lillback explained. “I think it is quite a statement for a Biblical theologian, because he is moving out of his normal sphere to say, ‘These principles really do matter for what we are doing as a country.'”

The heart-adorning of a godly women.

Do not let your adornment be merely outward—arranging the hair, wearing gold, or putting on fine apparel—rather let it be the hidden person of the heart, with the imperishable beauty of a quiet spirit, which is very precious in the sight of God. 1 Peter 3:3,4 NKJV.

1peterverse_blog

Heart, kardia, Strong’s #2588: The definition of this word is, “thoughts, feelings, mind, middle,” as the deepest, most inner recess of our being. A godly woman, abiding in the Holy Spirit (who Himself lives in the hidden place of our hearts) can grow to learn a trust in the insights and understanding the Lord gives her.
With a gentle and quiet spirit, God wants her to bring insight and value to her husband and their marriage. She is to be “adorned” with a spirit that is not self-exalting or casting herself as her husband’s teacher; yet, they are still ordained to be and become full partners as the husband receives the day-to-day relational “help” God has given to him in his wife.
Genesis 2:18 says, And the Lord God said, “It is not good that man should be alone; I will make him a helper comparable to him.” A helper indicates that Adam’s strength for all he was called to be and do was inadequate in itself. Comparable to him denotes complementarity. The needed help is for daily work, procreation, and mutual support through companionship.

 

 

 

 

As a former lump, are you cracked and allowing Jesus to shine from within you?

For God Who said, Let light shine out of darkness, has shone in our hearts so as [to beam forth] the Light for the illumination of the knowledge of the majesty and glory of God [as it is manifest in the Person and is revealed] in the face of Jesus Christ (the Messiah).
However, we possess this precious treasure [the divine Light of the Gospel] in [frail, human] vessels of earth, that the grandeur and exceeding greatness of the power may be shown to be from God and not from ourselves.
We are pressed in on every side [troubled and oppressed in every way], but not cramped or crushed; we suffer embarrassments and are perplexed and unable to find a way out, but not driven to despair;
We are pursued (persecuted and hard driven), but not deserted [to stand alone]; we are struck down to the ground, but never struck out and destroyed.

2 Corinthians 4:6-9 (Amplified Bible)     pot  

 Vessel, skeuos, a vessel, utensil, implement. Figuratively of the human body as formed of clay and thus frail and feeble (2 Cor. 4:7); of persons, ina moral respect (Rom. 9:22,23, refering to those in whom the divine mercy is to be exercised according to the purpose of the divine potter.

I take these verse’s as a warrant for us to be cracked-pots that leak His glorious presence to a darkened world.  This epistle’s theme which is ministry through weak vessels expresses the paradox of how weak human beings can be the vessels of the power of God. In the clay pot my weakness and God’s power come together.

A jar is designed to hold something, so let God fill your jar with His treasures!     

Receive what you were created to hold – HIS life
Receive what you were created to hold – HIS light 

 

Previous Older Entries Next Newer Entries