Jesus’ Gut Feeling The Motive For at Least Five Miracles.

And when Jesus went out He saw a great multitude; and He was moved with compassion for them, and healed their sick. Matt.14:14.

But when He saw the multitudes, He was moved with compassion for them, because they were weary and scattered, like sheep having no shepherd. Matt. 9:36.

compassion must act

Moved with compassion, splanchnizomai,Strong’s # 4697-To be moved with deep compassion or pity. The Greeks believed the bowels (splanchna) as the place where strong powerful emotions originated. The Hebrews also considered splanchna as the place where tender mercies and feelings of affection, compassion, sympathy, and pity originated.

Truest compassion is only found in the nature of God, because only God knows the full depth of an individuals pain, need, or suffering. Jesus is seen in the essence of His feeling human weaknesses (Heb. 4:15), fully sensing the ravaged condition of human brokenness.

In our kairos (Strong’s #2540) time now, his compassion is often manifested in inner healing and deliverance when the Holy Spirit makes it uncomfortable for an unclean spirit (demon) in a person by the person feeling a very uncomfortable stirring in their bowls. Our Lord is serving an eviction notice.

Christlikeness calls us to learn Jesus’ heart of compassion, a depth of sensitivity that can be worked in us through the Holy Spirit, reconditioning our hearts to be able to sense the pain of human bondage and to weep with those who weep (Heb. 13:3; Rom 12:15).

Jesus’ tears over Jerusalem (Luke 19:41-44) and His tears at the tomb of Lazarus (John 11:35) reveal more than either a sense of rejection by the people of one city or a grief over the death of a personal friend.

His compassion melted the hardness of all hearts that were blinded by their sin and for the tragedy of His creation (mankind) vulnerability to death. Compassion relates to the lost, the hurting, the needy, the distressed. Compassion is the direct motive for at least five of Jesus’ miracles.

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